If our presidents can take time to play golf, so can you! Here’s some presidential golf statistics.

We’re keeping it fun with some presidential golf facts!

  • Donald Trump
    Has won 19 club championships. Handicap Index reported to be 2.8
  • John F. Kennedy
    Despite chronic back pain, averaged 80.
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
    Installed a green outside the Oval Office; member at Augusta National. Became friends with Arnold Palmer.
  • Gerald R. Ford
    Despite a clumsy image, a legitimate 80s-shooter. He also played with Arnold Palmer.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt
    At 39, polio robbed him of a powerful golf swing
  • George W. Bush
    His handicap reported to dip under 10, post-presidency. He gave up golf during his presidency at the start of the Iraq War.
  • George H.W. Bush
    Once got his handicap down to 11. Favorite exclamation on the course was “Power outage!” when putts fell short
  • Bill Clinton
    Can break 90, especially using his “Billigans”
  • Barack Obama
    The lefty plays hoops and golf, more than 330 rounds during his two terms.
  • Ronald Reagan
    Didn’t play often or well (best was low 90s)
  • Warren G. Harding
    Struggled to break 95
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Played over 1,000 Rounds in office but almost never broke 100. He even enlisted his Secret Service agents to paint his golf balls black so that he could practice in the snow.
  • Richard M. Nixon
    He shot 79 once and quit the game
  • Lyndon B. Johnson
    Played with senators to secure votes for the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Calvin Coolidge
    When he vacated the White House, he left his clubs behind

 

Sources: Golf Digest, Cheat Sheet

Putting with the flagstick in could be a mistake, new Golf Digest study from Cal Poly professor shows

The question over whether you should putt with the flagstick in has sparked plenty of debate. The one thing missing until now has been any real science.

Partnering with California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo professor Tom Mase, a Ph.D in mechanical engineering and a member of the Golf Digest Hot List Technical Advisory Panel, we sought to find out if it is in fact true that putting with the flagstick in is always better than not. While Mase’s research is preliminary, the takeaway is pretty clear: The benefits of the flagstick are at best inconclusive and may in fact prevent off-center putts from going in more often than they would if the flagstick were removed.

In other words, hold on to your DeChambeau.

(Bryson DeChambeau, you’ll recall, seemed fairly unequivocal in his assessment of golf’s new rule that allows players to leave the flagstick in while putting. He said in January at the Sentry Tournament of Champions: “After the testing we’ve seen, and what we just did out there now, absolutely, I’m going to leave it in. I’m going to do it until I can see that it messes me up. For the most part, we’ve seen it to be a benefit and not a detriment. That’s from anywhere.”)

Mase’s study, conducted at Cal Poly’s golf practice center at Dairy Creek Golf Course with help from men’s coach Scott Cartwright and women’s coach Sofie Aagaard, used a putting device called the Perfect Putter to roll putts at a speed slightly faster than minimum holing speed. (The theory being that holing speed, approximately two-and-a-half feet past the hole, is not affected by the stick being left in the hole.) The Cal Poly study examined straight and breaking putts that crossed the hole at the upper third, the middle of the hole and the lower third.

Mase released a video of the test conducted last week.

The results showed that with a breaking putt entering the hole from the low side, keeping the flagstick in prevents some putts from being holed. With the flagstick out, those putts are holed every time.

The study also showed that the coefficient of restitution for the flagstick is relatively low, and that direct impacts with the stick, regardless of the type, tend to stop the ball fairly quickly, helping it to finish in the hole every time at a speed that sends the ball five to seven feet past the hole. Further tests of the different flagsticks showed that fiberglass sticks—those most commonly used on the PGA Tour—were the most forgiving, but while multi-diameter and tapered aluminum pins rejected putts that otherwise would have been made, even the fiberglass pin caused more putts to have been missed than were made with the flagstick out.

Off-center flagstick strikes on the low side of the hole tended to shoot the ball off farther away, hence the problem with balls rolling toward the hole on the low side.

Still, for putts entering on the high side, leaving the flagstick in wasn’t such a sure thing, either. While nine out of nine putts were made with the flagstick out, each of the three types of flagsticks yielded less than perfect results for high-side entry putts. For the multi-diameter aluminum stick, there were only seven makes. Same for the common fiberglass flagstick. But for the tapered aluminum stick, it got worse: only two of the nine putts were holed. That’s a difference of 78 percent between flagstick out and flagstick in.

In an earlier test from a longer distance, Mase found that straight-in putts were made 100 percent of the time with both the flagstick out and the flagstick in. On low side entry, putts were holed 80 percent of the time with the flagstick out, but only 56 percent of the time with the flagstick in.

Mase, who will continue to run further tests on the flagstick-in/out question at Cal Poly’s golf practice center, found the testing results surprising, given the current attitudes some tour players have expressed.

“While the sample is very small on this data, I believe it represents well what is happening here,” he said. “Low-side putts will definitely be hurt by having the pin in. Putts entering the center will be made with or without the pin. High side entering putts is a little bit of a pin type dependent problem. However, high-side hole entry without the pin performs best.

“The results are intriguing and perplexing. At first, I bought into the pin helping always. But it is too easy to set up a low-side entering putt that is made 100 percent without the pin and not close to 100 percent with any of the three pins tested.”

Your move, Bryson.

Source: Golf Digest

Why you should play more golf this year: 7 Health Benefits of Golf!

As all golfers know, a game of golf is both mentally stimulating and physically challenging. Golf may not be considered a physically demanding sport, but one round will likely mean you are outside and moving around, walking at a pace of 6-7km, for several hours at a time and constantly using your brain for the many mental challenges you face. There are many stated health benefits of golf, from scientific and anecdotal sources, but just how good is the game for the body and mind?

Seven health benefits of golf

  1. Heart health – any form of physical exercise helps get the blood pumping to your heart. Walking, carrying your bag and swinging all increase your heart rate and blood flow. Your risk of a stroke and diabetes are reduced, and there can be positive effects on reducing blood pressure and harmful cholesterol, especially if combined with a healthy diet and lifestyle. The Norwegian Golf Federation (NGF) found that during an 18-hole round, a player will have an average heart rate of 100 beats per minute, over a two to five hour period
  2. Brain stimulation – regular daily walking strengthens the brain’s memory circuits. Clive Ballard, director of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, says: ‘Whether it is going for a jog or walking the golf course, keeping physically active is a great way to keep your heart and your brain healthy. By keeping active you make sure your brain has a good, strong blood supply, which is essential to help it function better now and in future.”
  3. Weight loss – the golden number of steps per day needed for weight loss is 10,000. An 18-hole round easily exceeds this recommended number, especially when you walk and do not use a golf cart. The Norwegian Golf Federation (NGF) found that recent research projects (referring to those in Norway, Japan, Germany, the US and Sweden) revealed that a male golfer burns around 2,500 kCal during an 18-hole round, and female players burn approximately 1,500 kCal (read 9 Holes for Better Health – in Norwegian)
  4. Reduces stress – the pleasure of walking in fresh air, socialising, with an added mental challenge means golf releases endorphins, the natural mood-enhancing chemicals in your brain, which make you happy and relaxed
  5. Improved sleep – exercise and fresh air are a powerful combination for improved sleep. Walking the course will give you a good workout. Regular exercise helps you sleep faster and remain in a deep sleep for longer. Sleep helps your muscles rest and repair
  6. Low injury – golf is a low-impact activity in the sense that one walks on a soft, gently rolling surface. More mature players find this attractive as they can burn calories with a low risk of injury
  7. Live longer – a Swedish study by the Karolinska Institutet led by Professor Anders Ahlbom, found that golfers have a 40% lower death rate, which corresponds to a 5-year increase in life expectancy (read Golf: A game of life and death – reduced mortality in Swedish golf players)

“The health benefits of golf are far greater than most of us seem to believe, and may have a much greater and broader impact on our wellbeing than we may have realised. Considering how well a good golf facility can appeal to people of all age groups, golf is a wonderful way to encourage exercise,” says Edwin Roald, EIGCA Council member.

In addition to the scientific research above, the NY Times ran a story in July 2015 following two studies which found there are many health benefits of golf: “A walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the progress, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health.” (read this blog post).

Golf carts are not a fundamental part of the game

The use of golf carts is widespread and it can be all too easy to jump in a cart rather than take a leisurely stroll. While golf carts are useful in terms of enabling the elderly and people with disabilities to enjoy golf as a form of recreation, their extensive use has likely contributed, as much as anything else, to golf‘s apparent elitist image. Whenever possible, golfers should say no to a cart and play golf on foot, as it was meant to be played, and reap the rewards of the health benefits of golf.

Source: European Institute of Golf Course Architects

HERE’S 5 TIPS TO KEEP IMPROVING YOUR GOLF GAME AND MAINTAIN YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS!

As January comes to a close, how are you doing on your New Year’s resolutions?  Most of us make New Year’s resolutions and, unfortunately, most of us fail to see them through for all 365 days, or even 31 days.

If your resolution involved improving your golf game in 2019, here’s a list of things you can do every day/week — even if you’re in the bitter cold like a lot of folks right now — to help you achieve those goals.

And, once it warms up in your area, you can take all five of these drills outside.

5. Exercise. Yeah, we know. That’s what we should be doing every day anyway, right? But when it comes to golf, you don’t want to be tight. There are a number of stretches you can do right from your desk while reading emails that will benefit your arms, shoulders, neck, back, hips and legs for golf season.

Even better, place one of those handy, elastic, tension bands in the top drawer of your desk.

4. Take 100 swings per day in your house or garage… without a golf ball. The best players in the world visualize the shot they want to hit before they hit it. With a drill like this one, you’re going to be forced to visualize, because there’s no ball there to hit. If you’re able, place a mirror in front of you and pay attention to the positions of your address, takeaway, the top of your swing and impact position as well as follow through. Do it in slow motion. Become an expert on your swing.

3. Work on your chipping. Can’t do it outside? No worries. You can purchase a chipping net, or even put down a hula-hoop as a target. Get a few foam golf balls and a tiny turf mat to hit the balls off of.

Will it produce the same feel as a real golf ball? Of course not. But what it will do is force you to focus on a target and repeat the same motion over and over. After a long layoff, “touch,” is the first thing that goes for all golfers.

This will help you to work on some semblance of touch all winter long.

2. Practice your putting. Anywhere. All you need is a putter, a golf ball, a flat surface and an object — any object — to putt at. If you’re so inclined, rollout turf can be purchased for around $20 with holes cut out.

Since the greens are where you’re going to take most of your strokes, doesn’t it make sense to dial that in whenever possible? It can be fun too. Does your significant other, roommate, or child play? Have regular putting contests.

The feel you gain during those sessions may not seem like much, but man will they come in handy when your season begins on the real grass.

1. Make a weekly appointment with your PGA Professional. Even in areas of the country that are suffering through the cruelest of winter conditions, you can always find a place to hit golf balls inside. Contact your local PGA Professional to find out where places like this in your area exist. You might be surprised at all the options you have.

With your PGA Professional in tow, you can work on your swing throughout the winter months and keep your game sharp. How nice would it be to be on top of your game as soon as the courses in your area open in the spring?

Source: PGA.com

Merry Christmas from Olive Glenn Golf and Country Club!

Merry Christmas from everyone at Olive Glenn Golf and Country Club! We wish you and your family a safe and happy holiday!

CYBER MONDAY! It’s the Last Day of our Online Deals!

Join us for the Best Cyber Monday Ever! Find the Perfect gift for the golfer in your life. Sale Ends Today, so act fast!

5 Round Bundle for $272

 $100 Gift Card for $80!

 

It’s finally Black Friday! Don’t miss our online deals!

Join us for the Best Black Friday Ever! Find the Perfect gift for the golfer in your life. Sale Ends Cyber Monday, so act fast!

 

5 Round Bundle for $272

 $100 Gift Card for $80!

 

Black Friday is here at Olive Glenn!

Join us for the Best Black Friday Ever! Find the Perfect gift for the golfer in your life. Sale Ends Cyber Monday, so act fast!

5 Round Bundle for $272

 $100 Gift Card for $80!

 

The Best Black Friday Ever Is Coming Soon! Get Ready for Golf Specials!

 

The Holidays are coming up! Keep an eye out for great deals and gift ideas!

Giving golf is a great way to show you care! Here’s what you can expect for Black Friday Deals:

  • Round Packages
  • Gift Card Specials
  • And More!

Details to be released soon!

Tombstone Halloween Challenge deadline is Today at Noon!

2018 Tombstone Halloween Challenge

Entry Deadline Friday 10/26/18 at Noon

Join us on October 27th for 10:30 AM Tee Times and 18 Holes of our Tombstone Halloween Challenge!

Add your handicap to par to get your quota. Where will you plant your Tombstone? Can you finish before you run out of shots?

$30 Members/$55 Non-Members

Call the golf shop to enter now!             307-587-5551